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You and Your Research

I recently read a fascinating talk, the transcription of the Bell Communications Research Colloquium Seminar, by Dr. Richard W. Hamming.  Fan Chung was in the audience and the transcription is available on her website:

http://www.math.ucsd.edu/~fan/teach/YouAndYourResearch.pdf

Over the years, Hamming meet and interacted with many great minds.  

At Los Alamos I was brought in to run the computing machines which other people had got going, so those scientists and physicists could get back to business. I saw I was a stooge. I saw that although physically I was the same, they were different. And to put the thing bluntly, I was envious. I wanted to know why they were so different from me. I saw Feynman up close. I saw Fermi and Teller. I saw Oppenheimer. I saw Hans Bethe: he was my boss. I saw quite a few very capable people. I became very interested in the difference between those who do and those who might have done.

Hamming asked many questions and explored many of the traits that lead to successful careers.    One of the most interesting passages to me was:

Another trait, it took me a while to notice. I noticed the following facts about people who work with the door open or the door closed. I notice that if you have the door to your office closed, you get more work done today and tomorrow, and you are more productive than most. But 10 years later somehow you don’t know quite know what problems are worth working on; all the hard work you do is sort of tangential in importance. He who works with the door open gets all kinds of interruptions, but he also occasionally gets clues as to what the world is and what might be important. Now I cannot prove the cause and effect sequence because you might say, “The closed door is symbolic of a closed mind.” I don’t know. But I can say there is a pretty good correlation between those who work with the doors open and those who ultimately do important things, although people who work with doors closed often work harder.

 

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This entry was posted on March 19, 2013 by in Math Education and tagged , , .
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